Sunday School 2.0: Shark Tank for Spiritual Growth

July 29, 2018 § Leave a comment

The purpose of Sunday School 2.0 is to create an adaptive architecture of participation where everyone can experience what it feels like to be children of God, including:

  1. The Security of unconditional love
  2. Service to those outside
  3. The Struggle to create something worthwhile

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MissionalTrails.app: Pokémon GO Into All The Nations

June 27, 2018 § Leave a comment

“Where there is no vision, the people perish” — Proverbs 29:18a (KJV)

In our breakout session at the “hope” Kingdom Networking event, Tim Svboda of YWAM SF taught us that “Information creates Vision creates Mobilization creates Transformation.”  In particular, it is incredibly helpful to know the the ratio and distribution of:

  •  ethne: people groups, cultural touch points
  • evangel: churches, seminaries, ministries, etc.

Both at the aggregate “macro” city level for strategic planning, and at the “micro” street level for personal presence and ministry.

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Third Millennium Values

March 18, 2016 § Leave a comment

I deeply appreciate and respect the new focus and push for 21st-century learning outcomes.  I just don’t think they go far enough.

Here are the four core character traits that I believe are foundational to creating those outcomes, as well as healthier individuals, communities, and society.

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TBC 4: The Process for Products

February 20, 2015 § 3 Comments

In this series I have been building a case that Transforming the Bay with Christ (TBC) should consider reframing itself as a startup building a platform for governance. In this, our final installment, I will discuss the process necessary to build such a product.

One of the key insights about entrepreneurship in the last decade is that a startup is not just a small version of a established business. Rather, a startup is an organization formed to search for a business model, rather than execute one.

In particular, this implies that startups should be designed to maximize learning by exploiting surprises. This is the exact opposite of a traditional business, which attempts to increase predictability by avoiding surprises.

To get the optimal structure, we need to be clear on:

  1. Which things we need to learn (the problem)
  2. How we are going to learn them (the process)
  3. Who will own the learning (the people)
  4. What will prove we have learned the right lessons (the product)

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Triversity: How Preschool + Entrepreneurship Will Disrupt University

September 22, 2013 § Leave a comment

So far, 2013 is largely living up to the hype as a “tipping point” for education reform.  Conversations around disruption, blending, and mastery are becoming mainstream. At long last, it seems like every aspect of the educational is being reexamined and redesigned by someone. There is more opportunities for funding and innovation than ever before. Not all these experiments will work, but we as a society are arguably questioning and learning more about education in the last couple years than we have in the past century. Yet there is one aspect of the educational experience where even the most adventurous reformers (with a few exceptions) tread cautiously:  the assumption that attending college is a (if not the) primary goal of K-12 education.

A few forward-thinking schools may dare to list “college and career readiness” as if the two were equally valuable.  However, the brutal reality of modern education is that virtually every aspect of elementary and secondary education is optimized to help colleges decide which students to admit.  This is best seen in the “transcript” — a list of standardized courses and grades that end up defining both the identity and activity of students. Even the vast majority of charters and homeschools design themselves around that same artifact, with only token efforts to prepare students for success in the real world.

You may consider this a radical and unwarranted claim.  To back it up, let me present an alternate model of what school could (and should) look like if we removed that distortion.  I call it the Triversity.  It draws inspiration from the two areas of learning where almost nobody worries about college: preschool and entrepreneurship.  Here’s what it looks like. « Read the rest of this entry »

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